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Monday, September 12, 2016

Our Daughter of the Mountains

I am feeling worried about our chocolate girl. I started reading about all the possible causes of myoclonic seizures, and some are terrible. I knew about them already but seeing them written in black and white made them more real.

I'm trying to talk myself out of a funk by looking back at our time at one of our favorite places in the world - the high mountain pass where I met the pack after a long mountain bike ride in August. As I go through the photos, it is very clear that we've packed a lot into the time we've had with Shyla so far.

She leaped into mountain lakes many times this summer.

And she learned to nail the landings.

She's become so confident about her leaping and swimming that she's beating R to the ball a lot of the time. Just a little while ago, she would hang back and let him do the retrieving.

During our time in the San Juan mountains this year and previous years, we saw myriad gorgeous sunsets. This photo is Shyla, with a very typical relaxed look on her face, in the light of the setting sun.

And here, she's zooming toward me from a dropoff to the west of our campsite.

She's an amazing dog who has brought so much love and sweetness into our lives. She pours all her energy into anything that I ask her to do, like this recall in the mountains.

I hope that we have many more visits to the campsite with this mind-bending sunset view with our Shyla. Hopefully, there will be a relatively benign explanation for her myoclonic seizures and a way to control them.
Thanks for reading my ode to all the happiness we've found in the mountains with Shyla!

30 comments:

  1. We are thinking of you and Shyla and family. Hoping and wishing for the best.

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  2. Not knowing is so, so hard. I'm glad you have these memories to help console you and I hope you make many,many,many more together.

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  3. Many thoughts and prayers for Shyla and for you. She is a beautiful wonder.
    Blessings,
    Buddy

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  4. Such a sweetie! She always seems to be loving life!

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  5. She is too beautiful and sweet and full of life to have to endure this! All our best thoughts are with you.

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  6. We're glad R is doing better after his surgery, but sorry to learn Shyla is having a problem. We hope it is something mild and treatable!!!!

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  7. Remember that dogs live in the moment and she doesn't know anything is wrong. What are the vets saying or they still don't know what is causing this? I hope it stops or can be controlled soon. Not knowing is the worst. Prayers for all of you!

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  8. I briefly mentioned this before. I want to reinforce it. Keep this visual in your mind. The gamut of seizure causes and outcomes are on a bell curve. You have a ton of information. So in your mind, put the information on the curve. Most rare and horrible on the left, rising to most common in the middle and descending to best possible outcome on the far right. Now place Shyla at the very best end of that curve and leave her there. With no definitive diagnosis you must visualize the best possible benign cause (even idiopathic) and the best possible outcome. Shyla has beaten the odds on so many levels so you must put her in the best possible end of these odds as well.

    If you have to deal with something worse, you will deal with it soon enough. Meanwhile always remember that Shyla is smiling at the best end of the curve.

    I know just what's going through your mind. You may remember that our Lucy spent several days in an animal hospital after a seizure and we came home with no definitive diagnosis. A few exclusions and a long list of possibles. We were very lucky. She had the best possible outcome and no further seizures. It's over two years now. We will bring the POTP that the same happens with Shyla.

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    1. Thank you. That is a great visual, and I will keep it in mind. You are right - why obsess about the worst until if/when I am forced to? You are so level-headed! Thanks again.

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  9. I wonder if vitamin b12 deficiency could be a contributing factor? It can be implicated in seizures, and can be a cause of chronic anxiety and nervousness as well. It might be worth ruling out at least, but if it is a contributory factor, it is relatively easy to treat with injections. Thinking of you and Shyla xx

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    1. Great question. I just looked at her latest blood work, and it didn't measure B12. I'll ask my vet about this.

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  10. Appreciating what we have while we still have it and keeping our fingers crossed for the future. That's the best we can do, not poisoning the precious time we have worrying about what might happen. Easier said than done, but you are an inspiration.

    My fingers are crossed for you all.

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  11. Let there be peace, health and happiness for all in your home tonight. heartfelt words from you today, and hugs and love from down here for you all up North.

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  12. Our paws and fingers are tightly crossed for Shyla. Hugs to you, KB♥

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  13. It is so hard when our dogs are ill but can't help us figure out what it is. I hope this can be easily resolved!

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  14. Hugs to you and POTP... we hope so much that there is an explanation and a way to chase the seizure monster away...

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  15. We know how difficult it is before you get (if you can) a diagnosis on why this is happening to Shyla. We have our paws crossed for all of you.

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  16. Hugs to you and Shyla. She is a wonderful resilient girl, and so are you.

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  17. We are crossing our paws tight for sweet Shyla. Hopefully you can find a simple explanation and fix it soon!

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  18. Sending good vibes your way. Reading suff on the internet sounds scary sometimes. Let's pray it's fixable
    Lily & Edward

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    1. I think that reading stuff on the internet about illness should be outlawed!!! ;)

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  19. Hugs from all of us too. We worry about that sweet Shyla too.

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  20. We are sharing in your concern and hopes that this will be resolved and quickly!

    Your Pals,

    Murphy & Stanley

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  21. We are hugging you, and have been sending POTP for Shyla. We will not stop.
    We understand your anxiety right now.. Your trying your best to make the funk disappear.
    Shyla has overcome so much...she is happy, she is loved,, and she knows she is okay
    love
    tweedles

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  22. Thinking of you. I am here if you want or need to talk. I know with Gibson, how scary seizures and the unknown can be. Praying for the best for beautiful Shyla. Sending hugs.

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  23. Sending our love and lots of snuggles to you and Shyla!

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  24. Sending our love and hugs to you all.

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  25. Riley also suggests turning off "Doctor Google" (your vet/specialist will find a diagnosis) and instead spending time with your dogs enjoying nature will make you smile more!

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  26. I'm so sorry that Shyla has been having seizures! That's so scary. ((hugs))

    Those photos are beautiful! <3

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